The Blue Collar Food Plot

Posted on by Tracy Breen in Food Plots

Food plots have been all the rage with deer hunters for over a decade. If you turn on TV and watch a hunting show, you will probably see someone hunting whitetails over a food plot. Most of the food plots that show up on TV are far from your average food plot. Most TV food plots are as green as a Leprechaun’s thumb, the size of a Major League Baseball field (or larger), and are as groomed as a golf course.

Although this type of food plot looks great and attracts deer, large food plots are expensive, require lots of equipment and knowledge to maintain, and aren’t always practical for the average hunter.  

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Rethinking How to Create a Kill Plot

Posted on by Steve Bartylla in Food Plots, Hunting Strategy

I was beyond frustrated with myself. I’d just invested a full week’s worth of effort into clearing an in-woods kill plot with a chainsaw and gallons of sweat. I’d raked the debris, top seeded the ground and the plants were already emerging. Now, having packed the stand in with me, I walked in circles, staring at trees, fruitlessly trying to will one of them to work.

This is a problem far too many have. We all realize that having low impact stands to hunt is a key to success and keeping a property fresh. Still, far too often it’s an afterthought to our efforts to improve a property’s hunting quality.

Frankly, we reverse the steps for plot creation. The end result is often disappointment and almost never produces the best results. Here’s how to change that.

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Fixing Food Plot Failures

Posted on by Jeff Sturgis in Food Plots, Hunting Strategy

If you've turned a hand-crank on a broadcaster, driven a tractor or prayed for rain, you've probably experienced food plot failure like the rest of us. It happens. In fact, as the number of acres of new food plot forages and latest and greatest food plot blends continues to grow, so will the number of acres of food plot fails. Are your plots down to the dirt, plagued by weeds or doomed by drought? Don't worry; you and the local deer herd still have time to enjoy fields of food plot green. Here are three ways to make it happen!

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Fruit & Nut Trees for Your Food Plots

Posted on by Tracy Breen in Food Plots, Hunting Strategy

We all know the most popular food plots in America include clover, corn, soybeans and brassicas. While that might be the norm there's a growing trend among hunters of including fruit and nut trees to their arsenal. Here's some tips for using fruit and nut trees to attract deer to your hunting property.

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Food Plot Soil Testing 101

Posted on by Tracy Breen in Food Plots

Putting in successful food plots is similar to baking cookies. If you want the cookies to turn out, a simple recipe must be followed. Cutting a corner by omitting a key ingredient often causes the quality of the cookie to suffer. A food plot is similar. For a food plot to turn out, a series of steps must be taken to ensure success. One way to increase the chances of having food plot success is by doing a soil test before you plant a food plot. A soil test is like having a recipe in your hand for success because once you receive the soil test results, you will know exactly which ingredients will be needed to ensure a lush green food plot.

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A Food Plot for Every Season

Posted on by Tracy Breen in Food Plots, Hunting Strategy

Food plot season is here. This is a busy time of year here at Redneck Farms because we are tilling the ground, planting food plots, building bedding areas and doing many other things to prepare our property for the fall hunting season. Planting food plots is a lot of work. As a result, many hunters and land managers only plant food plots once a year with the goal of hunting over that food plot during deer season. According to Dr. Grant Woods from GrowingDeer.TV, if hunters are going to go through the work of planting food plots, they should think about providing deer with a year around food sources. “Providing deer with food during every season helps keep the deer healthy and strong all year. Having something growing all the time is good for the soil. The crops will be pulling nutrients up through the soil year round, which is good for soil health. I haven’t had to add fertilizer to any of my plots in two years because when each crop dies off, it drops leaves and the nutrients from the plant leach back into the soil. The process is started over so the soil is always healthy and full of nutrients. The plants act as a fertilizer for the next generation of plants that are planted quickly after the plot dies off. Constantly having crops growing saves me from having to fertilize as often,” Woods explained.

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How To Grow The Best Clover Food Plot

Posted on by Adam Keith in Food Plots

There are numerous types of clover that hunters use across the nation to provide quality food plot forage for deer and other wildlife. Here at The Proving Grounds it’s no different.  We typically plant Eagle Seed soybeans in our food plots. They are awesome for providing food for whitetails, turkey, and other critters  for 11 months out of the year. By combining a healthy stand of clover with Eagle Seed soybeans you can continue attracting  and holding whitetails on your property.

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Frost Seeding Clover Food Plots: Easy Off Season Project

Posted on by Adam Keith in Food Plots

It’s March 1st and we’ve officially survived the month of February. Now we’re taking on March. This time of year can be very boring for a whitetail hunter. Cabin fever can be a deer hunter’s worst enemy if they haven’t started shed hunting or found some off season management projects to keep themselves occupied until turkey season. One of these management projects that we are currently doing here at The Proving Grounds is frost seeding clover. We’ve posted a few pictures of the team frost seeding on our Facebook and Twitter pages. After posting, we’ve had some questions about what frost seeding is.

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